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    • Climate Outlook Update Outlook for December 2016 to February 2017

      Date Signed: 2016-11-29

      Type: Documents & Publications, Newsletters

      Themes: Themes, Meteorology & Climate, Climate Information


      For the period December 2016 to February 2017, there is an extension of below-normal rainfall conditions over Tanzania up to the extreme northern parts of Zambia, Malawi, Mozambique and the entire Madagascar. Other parts of the region are going to be the same as the previous projections from SARCOF-20, with the high likelihood of normal to above-normal rainfall conditions in the bulk of the SADC Region.

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    • SADC Agromet Update Issue-02 - 2016-2017 Season

      Date Signed: 2016-11-22

      Type: Documents & Publications, Newsletters

      Themes: Themes, Agriculture & Food Security, Agricultural Information


      The agricultural season has started well in southern areas that typically experience an onset of rains by mid-October through early November. Eastern South Africa, Swaziland and southern Madagascar received above average rains in October and early November (Figure 1, blue ovals #1 and #2). The rains have been sufficient for planting, which has started in the main maize growing areas of South Africa, Swaziland and Lesotho. Although planting has also started in Lesotho, rains there were reported to have arrived late. In contrast, northern parts of the region, including north-eastern Angola, southern/central DRC and northern Zambia, received below average early season rains (Figure 1, red oval #3). Rains were also below average in eastern Tanzania (Figure 1, red oval #4), including some of the bimodal areas.

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    • Regional Situation Update on the El NiƱo-Induced Drought - Issue 03: 24 October 2016

      Date Signed: 2016-10-24

      Type: Documents & Publications, Newsletters


      The negative impacts of the El Nino induced drought, the worst in 35 years, which has caused a humanitarian crisis affecting 39 million people or 13% of SADC population, continues to intensify. Several factors including depleted food reserves, rising food prices, lower commodity prices, slowing economic growth among other key factors, are exacerbating the situation. Staple food prices are rising due to the generally poor crop production over the past two years. The Regional cereal deficit currently stands at close to 7.4 metric tonnes and is 11% below the five year average dropping from 29 million tonnes in 2015 to 26 million tonnes in 2016 (figures exclude Mauritius and Seychelles). The majority of the population is now entirely dependent on the markets for food.

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